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What perennials divide in autumn and how to do the separation of plants correctly? Tips you will find here!

Dividing plants is good for the appearance and health of your garden. Crowded plants compete for resources, and they are more susceptible to plant diseases. Dividing is also an easy way to get plants cheaply. You can replant them in your garden or give the excess plants to friends and neighbors. To successfully propagate plants through division, timing is important. What perennials divide in the fall? We’ll address that in this article.

When to divide perennials

Dividing plants is good for the appearance and health of your garden

Plants that are stressed will tell you they need to be divided. They may bloom less or have smaller flowers. You may notice a ‘bald spot’ in the center of the plant. Or certain stems of the plant may need you to upsize them so they don’t fall over. Propagating plants by division, like pruning, is a seasonal task. But when to divide perennials? The same rule of thumb applies: divide spring-blooming plants in the fall and fall-blooming plants in the spring.

You don’t need to divide most perennials every year. Some are best divided every few years, while others can last a decade or more. It’s also best to divide plants on a cool, cloudy day so the sun doesn’t dry them out.

How to propagate plants by division

How to propagate perennials by division, learn from us

To divide a plant, first dig up the entire plant. Then brush or shake off as much soil as possible from the roots. Most perennials that you should divide in the fall are easy to pull apart. Use your hands or garden forks to separate the plants . For roots that are difficult to pry apart, you can use a spade or small handsaw to cut through them. This may sound aggressive, but you won’t do any permanent damage to the plant by separating them this way.

Once they are divided, you can plant them wherever you want. You can plant them back in the ground or in pots. Set them in nutrient-rich soil and water them regularly – you may want to add soil conditioner before transplanting. If you divide perennials in the fall, make sure the plants have at least six weeks to grow before the first average frost.

Which perennials to divide in the fall

Which perennials divide in the fall and how to do propagation properly

Here we have compiled a list of perennials that should be divided in the fall. Follow the tips and instructions for each of the plants you are dividing.

Dividing peonies

Peonies do not need to be divided often, but they tolerate it well


Peonies are popular for their showy blooms and sweet fragrance. They are low-maintenance, long-lived plants that can withstand even the harshest of winters. They do not need to be divided often, but they tolerate it well. Experts recommend dividing them in the fall . Each division of a peony should have three to six eyes.

Propagate daylilies before or after flowering.

Summer flowering plants like daylilies can usually be divided before or after blooming

Daylilies provide year-round color with their continuous summer blooms. They come in many bright colors. Summer-flowering plants like daylilies can usually be divided before or after flowering. When dividing daylilies in the fall, experts recommend cutting the foliage back to six to eight inches. Each division should have two or three leaf fans. Daylilies should be cut back in the fall even if they are not divided.

Oriental poppies autumn divide

Poppies are the next item on the list for fall division


Poppies are the next item on the list for fall division. These cheerful flowers are best known for their large, scarlet blooms, but there are many varieties of poppies with many colors. Divide these plants as they die back in the fall.

What perennials to divide in the fall: Siberian iris.

Experts recommend dividing Siberian irises in the fall

This smaller iris variety is popular for its attractive foliage and graceful flowers. Experts recommend dividing Siberian irises in the fall. Divide in a similar way to daylilies: cut back the foliage, leaving about three leaf fans, and maintain a good root system with each division.

Mulch garden phlox after division.

If you divide garden phlox in the fall, it's a good idea to mulch it after you transplant it

This long-blooming perennial has large, showy clusters of flowers that dazzle throughout the summer. If you divide garden phlox in the fall, it’s a good idea to mulch it after transplanting . A four- to six-inch layer of straw, pine needles or similar material should prevent repeated freezing and thawing of the soil, which could attack division plants planted in late summer/early fall.

Propagate weeping heart in the fall

With the watering heart, propagation by division is a popular option

Tear heart plants may not have the longest blooming season, but they make up for that time with quality and hardiness. The heart-shaped flowers of this garden plant enchant gardeners every spring. As a rule, self-sown plants take several years to bloom, so propagation by division is a popular option. Experts recommend division in the fall.

What perennials divide in the fall: Veronica.

It is recommended to divide Veronica in the fall when it stops blooming

Veronica, also known as speedwell, is a hardy perennial with spiky purple flowers. It is a versatile landscape plant that is great for filling in bare spots. It is recommended to divide this plant in the fall when it is no longer blooming .

Plants that are stressed will tell you they need to be divided