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What can you plant in July: What seeds are suitable for sowing in the summer in the garden or in pots?

July is a fantastic month for sowing seeds, as both soil and air temperatures are high. The long, warm days with good light conditions speed up germination and help extend the growing season in the vegetable patch and increase the stock of perennials, biennials and exotics in the ornamental garden and cutting bed. Remember, however, that the water table is lower at this time of year, so you may need to water more. What can you plant in July? Read on to find out!

What to plant in July: Vegetables

July is also a good month for planting seedlings that were grown from seed in previous months. It’s the last month to plant out young zucchini, squash and sweet corn – plant them early in the month to give them the best chance of maturing before the first fall frosts. Now is also the best time to plant out winter kale grown from seed in April and May so it will be ripe in time for Christmas and beyond.

Sow lettuce from March to September.

You can sow lettuce from March to September

Lettuce and other leaf lettuces are quick and easy to grow – sow seeds continuously from March to September for a year’s worth of fresh lettuce. Thin seedlings to 30 inches if you want to grow lettuces, and harvest the young leaves as needed if you want to grow lettuce varieties you can use again and again.

Sow carrots thinly in the garden

What to plant in July - carrots are good for summer sowing

July is considered the last month to sow carrots for a fall harvest. Sow directly and thinly in the garden with well-prepared soil or in pots with soil-based compost. Avoid thinning seedlings to prevent carrot fly.

What to plant in July: turnips.

July is considered the last month to sow beets for a fall harvest

The often forgotten rutabaga provides two harvests from one plant: the tender-sweet taproot can be eaten as well as the leaves or greens. Consume them soon after harvest, because turnips don’t store well.

Radishes are perfect for summer salads.

What to plant in July - Radishes are perfect for summer salads


Radishes ripen quickly, are easy to grow and virtually pest-free, and add a peppery note to salads. They can also be grown as companion plants to other crops.

Sowing dwarf beans in summer.

July is suitable for sowing pole beans

As with carrots, July is the last month to sow pole beans so the pods can mature before the first frosts in the fall. Sow dwarf varieties in the ground or in pots and keep them well watered.

The best time for winter cabbage

July is the best time to plant winter cabbage in the garden


Now is the best time to plant winter cabbage so it has plenty of time to mature before temperatures drop in the fall. Plant the cabbage 45 inches apart, leaving 60 inches between rows. Press down lightly and water well. You may need to protect your cabbage plants from cabbage whitefly caterpillars and pigeons with netting.

Not too late for pumpkin

What to sow in July - It's the best time for pumpkins

If you want pumpkins for baking , fall decorating or carving, now is the time to get your seeds in the ground. If you are short on space, opt for compact varieties, although pumpkins still need about 6 to 8 square feet to grow.

What to plant in July - some vegetables can still be sown

Place a few pumpkin seeds in each hole and keep them well watered, especially when flowers and fruit are forming.

Flowers to plant in July

Summer plants can still be sown in July

It’s not too late to plant flowers in the garden and in containers. Here are some of the most suitable flowers for sowing in July.

The popular garden flower delphinium.

July is the last month for sowing delphiniums

July is the last month to sow these popular garden plants, which will bloom next summer. Many delphiniums are also excellent bee plants.

Sow strelitzias throughout the summer.

The spectacular flowers of strelitzias make excellent cut flowers

Want to sow something completely different? Strelitzias (birds of paradise) are vibrant perennial greenhouse or houseplants that can be sown throughout the summer. The spectacular blooms also make excellent cut flowers.

What to plant in July: Forget-me-nots

Forget-me-nots can be sown from May to September

Forget-me-nots (Myosotis) can be sown from May to September to mimic the natural process of seed dispersal and germination after spring blooms. Scatter seeds in gaps in the flower bed or in seed trays for later planting.

Sow pansies early in the month.

Sow pansies early in July so they bloom in the spring

If you sow pansies now, they will have plenty of time to develop before they are planted out in the fall before they bloom. Sow early in the month so they will bloom in the spring.

Sow wallflowers for spring bloom now.

Sow in summer and plant out in fall, wallflowers will bloom in early spring

Sowed in summer and planted out in fall, wallflowers will bloom in early spring. Sow them now in multicellular trays or small pots for orange or yellow blooms early next year.

Sow lush foxgloves in summer.

You can sow the lush blooming foxgloves in July

If you sow foxgloves in July, they will have plenty of time to mature and bloom the following summer. Sprinkle the fine seeds on the surface of moist, peat-free sowing soil and later cover with a fine layer of vermiculite.

Moss rose blooms all summer long.

Moss roses bloom throughout the summer until the first frost in the fall

These hardy, low-growing succulents, also called purslane, tolerate heat and drought. They bloom all summer until the first frost and look fantastic in hanging baskets or beds.

Zinnia for a colorful garden.

Plant zinnia for a colorful summer garden

These hardy annuals give new life to a faded garden in vibrant shades of red, orange, white, salmon and pink. Zinnias bloom and thrive without you having to worry about them because they are very heat and drought tolerant.

Bright marigold for garden or containers.

Hardy annual marigolds stay perky until the first frost

These hardy annuals stay perky until the first frost. In bright shades of yellow, gold, orange and even creamy white, marigolds look great in any garden and add a bright pop of color to containers or beds.